ETRUSCAN & EARLY ITALIC ART

Treasures Of Pre-Roman Italy



FIGURES POTTERY METALWORK


Map of Italy c. 400 BC.

ETRUSCAN FIGURAL PIECES

EXTREMELY RARE WITH ITALIAN EXPORT PERMIT

11452. ETRUSCAN FRESCO. c. 5th century BC. 48 x 24 cm. 5.8 kilo. Broken in two sections. Minor paint loss consistent with age. No apparent repainting or restoration. Very rare!

Provenance: A private Italian collection. In the collection of the grandfather of the current owner for many years. Italian Ministry of Culture Export Permit.

Price on request.



8291. FINE ETRUSCAN TERRA COTTA HEAD, c. 3rd century BC. Large head of a young lady wearing earrings with beautiful serene smile and thick locks of hair emerging from under her veil. 4.5 x 5 x 7.5". Rare.

$6500.



9650. ETRUSCAN TERRA COTTA HEAD OF A YOUNG MAN, c. 4th century BC. The large strongly modeled head with the wild hair and heavy brow usually associated with representations of Alexander the Great. 5.5 x 6 x 7 inches. Chip to left rear edge. An exceptional example of ancient classical art. Very rare. On custom stand.

Provenance: A private North Eastern collection. Acquired in the 1980's from the estate of an American artist residing in Rome soon after the war who brought his collection into the US upon his return c. 1960.

$7500.



9718. EXCEPTIONAL ETRUSCAN TERRA COTTA HEAD OF A YOUTH, c. 4th century BC. The very expressive and realistic terra cotta head of a young man with sharp nose and deep set eyes. 4.5 x 5 x 5.5 inches. An exceptional example of the excellence of ancient Etruscan terra cotta portrait art. Rare this nice. On custom stand.

Provenance: A private North Eastern collection. Acquired in the 1980's from the estate of an American artist residing in Rome soon after the war who brought his collection into the US upon his return c. 1960.

$4500.



9062. LARGE ETRUSCAN TERRA COTTA FOOT. Classic Period, ca. 5th-4th century BC. The near life-sized or child-sized foot with excellent molded details. 3.75 x 4.1 x 8.1 inches. From the collection of an Italian diplomat formed early the 20th century. The Etruscans produced the finest large terra cotta figures of the ancient world. Rare.

Provenance: A private North Eastern collection. Acquired in the 1980's from the estate of an American artist residing in Rome soon after the war who brought his collection into the US upon his return c. 1960.

$1450.



8705. AN ETRUSCAN RELIEF FRAGMENT, ca. 5th-4th century BC. The terra cotta fragment with the wing and arm of a Victory holding a wreath. 5.5 x 6 inches. Excellent style.

$1450.



8706. AN ETRUSCAN RELIEF FRAGMENT, ca. 5th-4th century BC. The terra cotta fragment with a molded palmette and lily stalk. 4.75 x 5 inches. Excellent style.

$1250.



ETRUSCAN & VILLANOVAN POTTERY

7558. FINE ETRUSCAN PATERA, Circa 370-350 BC. The patera was a shallow footed bowl used to make offerings to the gods. Among many other customs the Romans may well have adopted the patera from the Etruscans and many Roman coins depict it. The shallow bowl with wide rolled rim on a footed base also with a rolled rim. The bowl with central cross dividing the interior into four sections, each with 3 dots; the rim with a five pointed stylized star with spiral points. The design in brown glaze against a beige background. Faliscan style, Genucilia group. Diameter: 14.2 cm. (5.6"). Height: ~5.5 cm. (2.2"). Condition: Choice and intact with excellent condition of the glaze.

Provenance: Acquired at Harmer Rooke Galleries New York, October, 1996. References: A nearly identical one appeared on the Arts & Entertainment Channel's Ancient Mysteries Series in a broadcast on the Etruscans hosted by Leonard Nimoy.

$2500.



8286. RARE ITALIC POLYCHROME BOWL, ca. 6th-4th century BC. With painted floral patterns. Some glaze abrasion. 6.9". Very rare.

$2500.



A CLASSIC EARLY FORM

8287. LARGE VILLANOVAN BICONICAL URN. Etruria. 8th-7th century BC. The heavy single handled bucchero vessel covered with complex incised geometric designs including large ornamented swastikas in triple squares around the waist. 12 x 15.5 inches. Intact with a couple of minor abrasions one side with no repair or restoration. An especially large and fine example said to be from Tarquinia. Museum quality and very rare this nice.

The Villanovan culture was the earliest Iron Age culture of central and northern Italy. It was the precursor to the Etruscan culture which followed it and heavily influenced the Romans in turn. Villanovan artiquities are quite rare, especially large pieces of this quality.

Provenance: A private North Eastern collection. Acquired in the 1980's from the estate of an American artist residing in Rome soon after the war who brought his collection into the US upon his return c. 1960.

$12,000.



ETRUSCAN, ITALIC & SAMNITE METALWORK

9056. RARE ETRUSCAN BRONZE BOSS, c. 6th-5th century BC. The bronze boss for funerary use with the molded head of a facing lion with a ring in its mouth. 8 inches in diameter. See 'The Etruscans', Buranelli 27-29 for similar bosses in the Vatican Museum collection. Very rare with such nice detail and condition. <

Provenance: A private North Eastern collection. Acquired in the 1980's from the estate of an American artist residing in Rome soon after the war who brought his collection into the US upon his return c. 1960.

$8500.



8738. A LARGE ITALIC PLATE FIBULA. Iron Age, c. 9th century BC. This 'serpentine' fibula is an elaboration of the simple Italic violin-bow fibula with a twisting and bending upper bow. One and two piece variations are known with both bent and straight pins. Catches can be either simple holders like a modern safety pin or more complex wire spirals. The most ornate fibulae like this one have engraved discs for catch-plates, knobbed pins and bows with added rings and spirals. Both elements of the fibula, bow and pin were cast, then hammered into shape. A wrapped coil of wire adorns the knobbed pin. The bow was cast as a long rod with concentric discs along the shaft, then twisted. The disc catch-plate is actually an extension of the bow hammered flat and coiled into a closed spiral. It is engraved with cross-hatched triangles and inter-locking crosses. The entire fibula is a tour-de-force of the metalsmith's art and a perfect illustration of the early European preoccupation with geometry. Repaired near knob. Would benefit from a professional cleaning which would reveal more detail.

Cf. Randall-MacIver, The Iron Age in Italy, A Study of Those Aspects of the Early Civilizations Which Are Neither Villanovan nor Etruscan (Oxford, 1927) fig. 66B. Johannes Sundwall, Die Alteren Italischen Fibeln (Berlin, 1943) fig. 255. 7 inches. One of a matching pair, the other one of the pair was exhibited in 'Plain Geometry, Armament and Adornment in Pre-Classical Europe' 1997 and published in the exhibition catalog, no. 12 from which the above description has been taken. It was then offered by a New York gallery at $14,000.

$4500.



7250. RARE VILLANOVAN MULTIPLE 'BOAT' FIBULA, 8th-6th century BC. The fibula with four boats, spirals and a long intact pin. 11.5 cm. Extremely rare type.

$1850.